Thompson Rivers University

Better by the dozen: TRU researchers receive grants

  Posted on: April 25, 2022

TRU sign east gate entrance-Oct 8 2017-1200px

Twelve TRU faculty members are digging deeper into their expertise with 2022 Internal Research Fund (IRF) awards. The fund provides a maximum of $100,000 annually to support research. The grant program is designed to assist faculty to become more competitive for external funding and to scaffold faculty development, especially in terms of tenure and promotion. Those awarded are:

Faculty of Education and Social Work

  • Cory Jobb, Early childhood pedagogies in blasted landscapes

Faculty of Science

  • Emad Mohammed, Robust machine learning framework with health-care applications
  • Naowarat Cheeptham, Probiotics for western bats: optimization of cryoprotectants and freeze-drying conditions for scale-up production
  • Natasha Ramroop Singh, Qualifying the perceived changes in interpretation and acceptance of science and scientific dogma through the activities of a structured “science-in-art” competition for primary and secondary school students
  • Geoff Fink, Quadruped robot crop-relative guidance using computer vision
  • Yasheng Maimaitijiang, A robust and reproducible online classifier to predict methylation status of a predictive biomarker MGMT to predict response to chemotherapy (temozolomide) in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients
  • Yan Yan, Machine learning on single-cell RNA-seq data
  • Yue Zhang, Branching out to speciation in a model of fractionation: the teleosts

School of Nursing

  • Melba D’Souza, Enhancing patient engagement in the care of adult cancer survivors and caregivers through a psychoeducational supportive care in the Interior region of British Columbia
  • Sheila Blackstock, Two phased study: Contributing factors to nursing students’ experiences of incivility in nursing practice

School of Tourism

  • Kellee Caton, (Rebooting) too late tourism

Bob Gaglardi School of Business and Economics

Angus Duff, Worker by day – van dweller by night: An ethnographic study of Vancouver workers living in vans and motorhomes