Thompson Rivers University

Supports teaming up to stall writing procrastination

  Posted on: November 4, 2015

Write through the night

Taking a writing-intensive course? Major final research essays due in November? Don’t pull a stressed-out all-nighter on your own the last week of classes. Join a campus community of writers and academic support services at the Long Night Against Procrastination (LNAP)and stay up late together, where help and encouragement is available.

And that’s just the teaser.

LNAP starts 8 p.m. Nov. 5 and wraps 8 a.m. Nov. 6 with most events at the Main Library. Workshops and other activities are planned while some faculty will be on hand providing Office Hours.

LNAP is global effort to create a safe and supportive environment for writers. It first started in 2010 at the European University Viadrina, Germany as a way of supporting students academically.

The underlying goal is to provide a little encouragement and support because writing is often a lonely endeavour.

Schedule

Among the workshop highlights

The Power of introversion, 10 p.m.—A counselling staff member speaks to how introverts are dramatically undervalued and will look at ways to increase their inclusion in and outside the classroom.

Presenting a paper is easy, 11 p.m.—Two theatre students will share their expertise about speaking in front of a crowd and provide examples of what and what not to do.

Break that habit! Improve your writing by overcoming bad writing behaviours, 1 a.m.—Why are you getting the same comments on your paper and from your teachers? Learn some easy to apply tips from a student who is also Writing Centre tutor.

5 things to know about APA and MLA, 2:30 a.m.—Just the key things to know to get started, how library search tools can save time citing, and your questions.

Punctation! Stop avoiding punctuation with these quick and dirty tricks, 3 a.m.—Learn the proper use of various types of punctuation: semi-colons, commas and colons.

Interpreting your assignment, 4 a.m.—Making sense of the assignment’s instructions is the first step in knowing what you’re being asked to do.