Thompson Rivers University
Thompson Rivers University

Aboriginals science camp

  Posted on: July 7, 2010

Kayla, from Kamloops, is absorbed by the demonstration showing the principle behind fireworks. Students were shown how a flame displays a different colour depending on the metal compound sprayed into the flame. In this case, copper was the compound.

Hands on science experiments and health-science activities are on the minds of nine Aboriginal high school students participating in a summer camp this week at TRU.

The camp is geared towards Aboriginal students and is a multi-year partnership sponsored by TRU Aboriginal Education Centre, TRU Faculty of Science, TRU Eureka! Science Program, and School District #73 Aboriginal Education.

Students are here from Terrace, Prince George, Telkwa (near Smithers), Chase, and Kamloops.

Among the activities this week: learning how atoms expand and contract when exposed to different temperatures, how to make best guesses based on knowledge at hand, swabbing for bacteria, analyzing bacteria, understanding the need for good hygiene, and observing birds around hoodoos in Brocklehurst.

Kayla, from Kamloops,  is absorbed by the demonstration showing the principle behind fireworks. Students were shown how a flame displays a different colour depending on the metal compound sprayed into the flame. In this case, copper was the compound.

Kayla, from Kamloops, is absorbed by a demonstration of the principle behind fireworks. Students learned that a flame changes colour depending on the metal compound interacting with the flame. In this case, a copper and water solution was sprayed into the flame of a Bunsen Burner and the green flame was the result.

Campers participate in the black box experiment. In this example, students are guessing the contents inside the box as well as the configuration of compartments. A list on a nearby blackboard indicates the possible objects and partitions. Students draw their conclusions on how the contents move and sound and how much the contents move around.

Campers participate in the black box experiment of making a best guess based on knowledge at hand. In this example, students not only are attempting to guess the contents inside the box, but also how the box has been partitioned internally. A list on a nearby blackboard provides students with possible objects and partition options. Much like trying to guess the contents of a wrapped Christmas or birthday present, guesses are based on how the contents move within the box and the sounds the objects make when in motion.

David, of Prince George, at the black board as students discuss their findings following the black box test. Pictured on the board are some of the options of how the box was partitioned.

David, of Prince George, takes a turn at the chalk board as students discuss their guesses from the black box test. Some of the partition options are pictured on the chalk board.